September 2021

 

News Archive

Betty Nostrand, Editor
Molly Fisher, Publisher


President's Letter

Greetings LAVGC Members

First, I want to express my appreciation to all who have called or sent a card expressing your condolences to me in the loss of my son in May of this year. As you can imagine it was especially hard after losing my daughter last year. You can be sure your kind thoughts helped.

I know others have suffered losses during the pandemic, both to Covid and other reasons, and my thoughts and prayers go out to you and your families.

We are looking forward to starting our meetings in September and once more we will be doing them via Zoom. We had hoped for in person meetings with Zoom being an add on, but with the recent directions to again wear masks and the rise in cases we have decided to continue with Zoom. We will advise when it seems comfortable to move back to in person meetings.

So many members have been using their talents to continue participation in outdoor activities such as Eden Garden, Hansen Rose Garden, Sensory Garden, and Clare's Garden plus helping in our Home and Garden Sale scheduled late in August, that I extend a big thank you here. (These are all outside activities and so able to perform with or without masks)

The California Garden Club has presented LAVGC with a Blue Ribbon Certificate of Achievement for the 2020 Awards year. Each of you are the reason for this award. Thank you

I hope you have sent in your membership renewal form so that you can be included in our printed yearbook. We will be updating the membership list on our web site but also plan on doing a print version. At the very end of this newsletter (pages 6 and 7) is our 2021/2022 budget. Please review and be ready to offer suggestions. It will be up for approval at our September meeting.

So many members have been using their talents to continue participation in outdoor activities such as Eden Garden, Hansen Rose Garden, Sensory Garden, and Clare's Garden plus helping in our Home and Garden Sale scheduled late in August, that I extend a big thank you here. (These are all outside activities and so able to perform with or without masks).

The California Garden Club has presented LAVGC with a Blue Ribbon Certificate of Achievement for the 2020 Awards year. Each of you are the reason for this award. Thank you

Stay healthy and happy gardening. Jeri

Editor's note: You will find a copy of our proposed budget for the 2021/2022 year on the LAVGC web site in the Home page. Review so that we can answer any questions before we ask for approval. Contact Jeri Stark, President or Norma Foss, Treasurer if you have questions. See the LAVGC Yearbook for their additional contact information.

Jeri Stark, President.

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Misc. Items of Interest

...Member Alert: Please contact Molly Fisher, Publisher if you have changes to your contact information. See the LAVGC Yearbook for additional contact information.

...Newsletter questions or changes? Please contact Molly Fisher, Publisher. See the LAVGC Yearbook for additional contact information.

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September shoulds.................in the garden

...can't wait to hear what our speaker has to say about managing our gardens in the drought. No mandatory water restrictions yet, but they seem to be on the way with so many fires and no rain in sight. Harder on people that are still practicing the last drought measures from a few years ago. If I am still cutting back some 10-15% percent from that time and now I have to cut back 15% more - is this fair?? I don't know what a fair system is, but using less and less water is going to be tough. I have been trying to wean my plants back and use less water than I usually do since the spring.

...I also left the leaf and debris on the soil as a mulch. That was partly that physically I haven't been able to get in the beds and get it out and partly because I kept reading to do that. I'm not sure that it is visually wonderful but it is cheap and it seems to be working. Gives that rustic look to the garden. And, knock on wood, I haven't had any problems with snails or slugs. Maybe a good side to the drought and dry beds.

...I've also gone with the theory that pruning back shrubs and plants gives them less to maintain. This is a good time to prune things like geraniums and summer blooming shrubs because any new growth it stimulates will have a chance to get past the very new vulnerable stage and 'harden off' before any frosts set in this winter. If the plant blooms in early spring, don't prune it now as you may be cutting off the new buds.

...This seems to be a hot summer so I have even been giving my cactus and large succulents a drink now and then when they usually just have to survive without any moisture from me over the summer.

...if you order your spring bulbs from a catalog you better get on it. If you did order tulips and they arrive soon and you are supposed to chill them for six weeks in your refrigerator, be sure there are no apples in there. They don't get along and the gas given off by the apples will ruin the blooms on the tulips.

...this is such a good time of year to plant new plants but I have been holding off a bit because new plants, even natives, require water right after planting. A great time to re-think succulents because they don't want any water right after planting and seem to survive on very little moisture. Many succulents will be much happier when our hot weather is over and this often isn't until October.

...You can take off all the dead leaves and trim unsightly iris foliage back to about six-inch fans.

...plants love coffee grounds. Even if you don't have a compost pile or worm bin you can just put the grounds around any or all plants, especially those that tend to like an acid soil. ..as your vegetables, herbs, and flowers begin to set seed or die back, you can save the seeds for our Seed share group that will probably start up again this fall. Keep them in paper bags so they don't mildew or go bad. If you need more direction on a specific plant, contact at Sondra Bierre.

...deadhead roses and give them a feeding and good watering so they'll produce a final round of blooms this fall. Note which varieties have not produced well or have had lots of pest or disease problems and plan to replace them over the winter or choose another variety of plant for that spot that won't take as much water. There are even new roses now that survive and bloom on a lot less water. So don't waste energy and worry on plants that are not suited to your location.